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Growing nanotubes in a targeted way

Precursor molecules (yellow) act as seeds which allow the flat sheet of carbon atoms to form a tube. (Image: Konstantin Amsharov)They are light yet stronger than steel, as a semiconductor they are more efficient than silicon, and they conduct electricity better than copper: carbon nanotubes. For the first time, a team of international researchers, some of whom are based at FAU, have grown single-walled carbon nanotubes in a targeted way. It is hoped that their method could pave the way for new materials which could be used in light detectors, photovoltaic components, transistors or sensors. more...

  • What are the effects of nanoparticles?

    Researchers at FAU are investigating various types of nanoparticles, such as zinc oxide nanoparticles, which take the shape of rods (top left), spheres (top right), plates (bottom left) or tetrahedrons (bottom right). These extremely small particles have different effects depending on their shape. A human hair is around 800 times thicker than the particles shown here. (Image: FAU)When is a text a ‘good’ text? And when is a drawing art? Objective criteria for assessing creative performance – whether creative processes or a finished work – are hard to come by. An interdisciplinary research group led by FAU has now proposed a method for developing the creative potential of young people and determined the role that self-reflection plays in creative processes. The researchers aim to develop a modern concept for implementing measures which encourage creativity at universities and schools. more...

  • Stronger ties between physics and medicine

    Erlangen Castle (Image: FAU)A unique institution, the only one of its kind in the world, which combines fundamental research in mathematics and physics with clinical research will be set up in Erlangen over the course of the next three years: a Max Planck centre for physics and medicine which will be a joint project involving the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light (MPL), FAU and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen. Over 100 researchers will work at the centre to find ways in which findings from fundamental research in mathematics and physics can be applied in medicine to the benefit of patients. The Bavarian government is supporting the creation of this centre with around 60 million euros as part of the Northern Bavaria Initiative. more...